Our second annual global report into writing effectiveness, State of Writing 2021, is now available.

A simple rule for apostrophes

Posted by Wendy Wood on 28th August , 2019 in Grammar
Share this

An apostrophe is used to indicate ownership – or possession – and in contractions of “noun/pronoun is” or “noun/pronoun was”.

Apostrophes are never used to make a word plural.

To make a plural, just add an s. (Well, except when using words like child, sheep, fish, man, woman, deer. I could go on, but you get the idea.)

An English teacher decades ago taught me a little trick to always get it right.

PSPS: Plurals Simply Put an S.

Simple, right?

Wendy Wood, proofreader

 

 

Did you enjoy Super Grammar?

Get a new and super useful grammar tip from our proofreader Wendy, directly to your inbox, once a fortnight in Typeset’s The Write Fit newsletter. Subscribe here:

 

thumbnail

Know what you need?
Get in touch for an obligation-free chat!

Let's get started

© 2022 Typeset®. All rights reserved. Work With Us

I’d like free content marketing insights
Pop your email in the box and we’ll keep in touch through our newsletter, which is jam-packed with great information and advice. (We’ll never pass on your details to anyone!)


Site by StudioJS